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046: Dawn Scott on supporting the USA women’s football team to successive World Cups

Dawn Scott, High Performance Coach to the USA women’s national football team, who happen to have won two successive World cup titles and Olympic gold in 2012, is this episode’s guest.

In this interview you’ll hear about Dawn’s journey from her early days grafting away with women’s football, taking a lead role at the English FA and then taking the leap to working with the US team. Critically you’ll hear how it has been for Dawn under the spotlight of supporting the team under the big moments of the numerous finals the team have competed in. You’ll also hear about how it has felt growing with a sport that has emerged from obscurity to global prominence

The conversation was rich with insight about the pivotal moments when it all felt really fragile, when results and the outcome have felt like they’ve hung over everything, the team’s future, the coaching staff’s future and with that the prospects of the game.

Show notes

Dawn Scott background, education and route into Sport Science

World Cup win with the USA team, back to reality and training, nutrition and appropriate recovery

Overview of Dawn’s background and career progression

Applied jobs in sport science weren’t the norm!

Basic applied sport science, paper and pencil wellness and basic heart rate monitoring

The USA approached Dawn and she moved out in 2010

Dawn’s football background and being a Newcastle fan with her Dad

What got Dawn the job at a national level…?

Sharing your knowledge, understanding the process, what is your role in camp how do your define your role, find your niche and start to integrate your ideas?

It always has to be about the player, to impact them and their performance

Dawn discusses support team and individual temperament, what is required during match performances

Individualisation, knowing the players and how best to equip them for matches and for recovery. Going the extra mile.

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https://twitter.com/DawnScott06

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steveingham

Dr Steve Ingham is one of the UK’s leading figures in sport and one of the world’s leading performance scientists. He is steeped in high performance and has been integral to the development of Britain into an Olympic superpower. He has provided support to over 1000 athletes, of which over 200 have achieved World or Olympic medal success, including some of the world’s greatest athletes such as Jessica Ennis-Hill, Sir Steve Redgrave and Sir Matthew Pinsent. Steve has coached Kelly Sotherton's running for heptathlon and to 4x400m Olympic medal winning success. Steve has worked at the English Sports Council British Olympic Association, English Institute of Sport, where Steve was the Director of Science and Technical Development, leading a team of 200 scientists in support of Team GB and Paralympics GB. Ingham holds a BSc, PhD and is a Fellow of the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences. Steve is author of the best selling ‘How to Support a Champion: The art of applying science to the elite athlete’, discussing and inspiring the importance of learning and adapting to reach our maximum potential. Steve established Supporting Champions with the ambition of helping ambitious people to find a better way of creating high-performance. Steve hosts the Supporting Champions Podcast on sharing his pursuit of understanding and exploration in performance.

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