Chrissie Wellington OBE four time World Ironman Triathlon Champion and holder of the three world ironman records shares her experiences of performing at the top end of world triathlon.

Chrissie spoke at the Supporting Champions Conference in March 2018 and gave such a stirring speech I was keen to catch up further with her to share her story on the podcast and explore some of the areas she spoke about so passionately about at our event.

In this interview Chrissie shares her journey into becoming professional, what it was like on the start line, during the races and crossing the finish line. Importantly Chrissie talks about what becoming World Champion meant to her and how she utilised it for greater good.

Chrissie is a powerful, soulful and inspirational person with an infectious enthusiasm. But equally she is deeply thoughtful, considerate and hopeful about how she approaches life and her legacy.

Enjoy!

Show notes
Episode #18
1:40 Supporting Champions Conference (March 19/20 2019) update
5:50 Early beginnings in sport, driven, determined a perfectionist but channelled.
9:35 Trying out triathlon
11:30 A dislike for mediocrity!
15:10 Be brave enough to explore your talents
17:50 Physical environment, financial support, medical support combined with drive and agency create what is needed to succeed
19:55 No expectation or pressure for the first World Ironman attempt
21:20 Late qualification, accommodation half way up the volcano, a broken pedal – not the perfect prep but racing with no expectation.
24:30 Goal setting focus on process rather than victory
26:33 “Chrissie you’re going to win this!”
29:50 A sense of euphoria
31:30 The process of an ironman equates to the rollercoaster of life: extreme highs and lows
32:45 The importance and the power of sport to create change
36:50 Rabbit in the headlights
38:40 Withdrawal from an Ironman due to illness
41:20 2011 bike accident led to ‘just a flesh wound’ and the freedom to race
46:00 Giving everything and being capable of overcoming more than Chrissie ever believed she could
48:06 Characteristics and traits
49:20 What’s next…family, Parkrun, public speaking and ambassador for a range of companies
52:20 Ultra running!
53: 20 Raising a passionate, effervescent, confident, empathetic and adventurous child
56:20 Making mistakes & being emotional showing our imperfect selves
57:30 80 year old self advice: you are capable of so much more than you think. To strive, to keep reaching and to be kind to your self
59:00 Find out more about Chrissie:
Twitter @chrissiesmiles
www.chrissiewellington.org
Books
A Life Without Limits: A World Champion’s Journey
To The Finish Line: A World Champions Triathlete’s Guide To You Perfect Race

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steveingham

Dr Steve Ingham is one of the UK’s leading figures in sport and one of the world’s leading performance scientists. He is steeped in high performance and has been integral to the development of Britain into an Olympic superpower. He has provided support to over 1000 athletes, of which over 200 have achieved World or Olympic medal success, including some of the world’s greatest athletes such as Jessica Ennis-Hill, Sir Steve Redgrave and Sir Matthew Pinsent. Steve has coached Kelly Sotherton's running for heptathlon and to 4x400m Olympic medal winning success. Steve has worked at the English Sports Council British Olympic Association, English Institute of Sport, where Steve was the Director of Science and Technical Development, leading a team of 200 scientists in support of Team GB and Paralympics GB. Ingham holds a BSc, PhD and is a Fellow of the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences. Steve is author of the best selling ‘How to Support a Champion: The art of applying science to the elite athlete’, discussing and inspiring the importance of learning and adapting to reach our maximum potential. Steve established Supporting Champions with the ambition of helping ambitious people to find a better way of creating high-performance. Steve hosts the Supporting Champions Podcast on sharing his pursuit of understanding and exploration in performance.

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