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Touch, Pause and Engage*: What you might expect at the start of an applied sports science interview.

Touch, Pause and Engage*: What you might expect at the start of an applied sports science interview.

For more performance insights join us at the https://www.supportingchampions.co.uk/3iworkshops Previous blogs in this series 1. Introduction 2. Making an impressive impression “A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step.” Lao Tzu The interviewing begins and the selectors welcome you. There are reams of work written on polite small-talk (“Where are you based?” etc), handshaking…

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Making an impressive impression: The importance of the initial contact for interviews in applied sports science

Making an impressive impression: The importance of the initial contact for interviews in applied sport science

This blog is part of a series about interviewing for applied sport science, if you missed last week’s intro, here it is. “We’re generally overconfident in our opinions and our impressions and judgments.” Daniel Kahneman Woah there introductory blog, you give the impression that we are done and dusted with the preamble and we are about to dive…

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Choosing to be wheat or chaff

Choosing to be wheat or chaff: A view from interviewing in applied sport science

“The story of the human race is the story of men and women selling themselves short.” Abraham Maslow If you put ‘job interview’ into Google – it will return a google number of articles about some principles or methods of how to ace it. Despite this, my experience of upwards of 500 interviews of sports scientists tells me…

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Top 10 Applications: No 1. Power to the revolution

I am a runner. Well I used to run. Actually I still run, but only a couple of times per week. But I used to try to sprint. I wasn’t very good, but I had a nice time trying! Nevertheless running has been my predominant sport. This is my way of declaring my lack of bias toward what…

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Top 10 applications: No. 6 Painting the complete training picture

This week’s topic, in my humble opinion, is the most neglected subject area in the Sports Science education system*. If the evidence that I refer to is indirect I apologise, but in the graduate population I encounter their understanding of this area is almost completely absent. Therefore, if there are course leaders reading this please include the subject…

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Top 10 applications: No. 8 A fan of cooling

Top 10 applications: No. 8 A fan of cooling

I have a vision of three local folk in the ancient town of Marathon wandering about in blue and silver striped waistcoats unsure if they are looking cool, but not actually feeling cool. They are probably curious about the horizontal panels in their waistcoat, containing some form of crystals – ‘is this fashion?”, and they might also be…

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Top 10 applications: No.9 Hitting the buffers

Top 10 applications: No.9 Hitting the buffers

David Bruce (DB) Dill of the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory was the first to systematically, explore exercise tolerance in response to the manipulation of blood acid-base balance. His group and several others had first increased blood acidity and noticed a worsening of exercise performance. This led them to developing the hypothesising that increasing basicity would facilitate exercise performance, and…

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Sleep to Win

Top 10 applications, No. 10 “A well-spent day brings happy sleep”, (Leonardo da Vinci)

“A well-spent day brings happy sleep”, (Leonardo da Vinci) No. 10 – Sleep Sometime around the summer of 2002 I was roped into participating in a study by Charlie Pedlar. For three days, we carted down to the sleep laboratories at Surrey University and spent about an hour having wires glued to my head, jaw, chin, arm, leg…

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